A Situation of Utter Denial

Amongst the key pieces of legislation introduced under the previous New Labour administration by the two Home Secretaries perhaps most obsessed with not only talking tough, but actually appearing to be tough at the same time, in relation to Anti-Social Behaviour, Jack Straw and David Blunkett, was the Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003. Described in the wording of the Act itself as ‘An Act to make provision in connection with anti-social behaviour’, the A.S.B. Act 2003 was to give not only the Police, but also social landlords, a wide range of powers with which to crack down on those involved in the taking, distribution and sale of hard drugs from premises directly located within what remains of the country’s Social Housing stock.

The idea of the Act to begin with, and the principal motivation for its passing into law in the first place, was to create a situation in which housing estates that had become major centres for drug dealing, and the sale and distribution of ‘Crack’ cocaine and heroin in particular, under the previous Conservative administration, could be cleaned up relatively easily without the complex or expensive legal procedures that had previously hampered local administrative bodies of one kind or another during the nineteen eighties and nineties. One of the reasons why it was deemed necessary for such pieces of legislation to be introduced at all was the government’s intention to initiate a country wide upgrading of the Social Housing stock during the second half of the ‘Noughties’, as a means of improving the living standards of huge swathes of the community who it saw as having been left behind by the Thatcher and Major administrations that it had succeeded.

In spite of the best intentions of many of those who were  to serve within the Blair and Brown governments under which this legislation was to be introduced, implemented and originally enforced, in Tony Blair’s own County Durham Constituency back yard of Teesdale in what was formerly the South West Durham Coalfield, none of this legislation appears to have been used at any time during the whole of the last Labour Administration. And, as if that wasn’t enough, many of those who, under normal circumstances, would have been responsible for seeing such matters through appear to have been active in attempting to subvert the will of Parliament directly; for what may well turn out to be their own financial gain.

As we have already noted in an earlier posting in this thread, on High Etherley‘s notorious Red House Estate, the Slack Family and their associates appear to have been able to conduct a campaign of harassment and nuisance in relation to their neighbours and fellow tenants, with complete and utter impunity, for a period of some twenty years. In addition to allegations of some sort of a direct physical relationship between a number of family members and a former Housing Manager with the Housing Association that took over responsibility for the estate from the now defunct Teesdale District Council in 2006, the Housing Association has operated a policy of utter denial whenever it comes to complaints about any of the activities with which the Slacks themselves are known, and can be proven, to have been involved.

Following a series of well ordered written complaints to a number of senior Police Officers within the local power structure of the South Durham Area Command, the Red House Estate was declared a Local Multi-Agency Partnership Problem Solving Zone (L.M.A.P.S. Zone) during the closing months of 2011. Following the initial serving of warrants on key premises on the estate where the kind of activities referred to in the opening paragraphs of this posting can be proven to have been carried out, further raids were conducted in and around the Estate, culminating in the arrival of a veritable convoy of Police vehicles during the course of the evening and night of Wednesday 6th and early hours of the morning of Thursday 7th June 2012.

In spite of this Teesdale Housing Association appear to have taken little or no action at the time of these Police actions, even though, as a member of the so called L.M.A.P.S. Partnership, they were under a statutory obligation to do so. In due course we shall examine these events in more depth and detail. In the mean time it would be sufficient to present evidence that at the centre of these Police operations was a flat at that time occupied by an individual generally referred to as Gareth Slack, whose involvement with the wholesale theft of copper and other metals was well known to Teesdale Housing Association well before they saw fit to install him in the premises to which we refer in the first place.

The edited and embedded video clips at the top of this page show the last of the Police Operations referred to during the course of this posting actually taking place, whilst the photograph below shows the individual generally known as Gareth Slack being arrested by Police in connection with a related matter in the weeks that were to follow. In spite of this, as the extract from a written response from Teesdale Housing Association with regard to a complaint that was submitted to them by one of several disgruntled tenants at the time this was going on clearly shows, the canteen culture of denial that has persisted within the above institution in relation to anything vaguely connected with the Slacks, until those in charge are actually forced to take action by situations such as the campaign of written protest of which this complaint was a part, can still be seen in evidence some several weeks after the events you see here had actually taken place. Why?

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